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Adoption Agreement between Adult and Adopting Parent Agreement made on the ___ (date), between___ (Name of Adoptive Parent) of ___ ___ (street address, city, state, zip code), referred to herein as
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FAQ

An adult adoption may occur once the potential adoptee reaches the age of 18 or older. At that time, the only consent required is that of the adult wishing to be adopted and, of course, the person willing to adopt.

The Adoption and Children Act (2002) states, "An application for an adoption order may only be made if the person to be adopted has not attained the age of 18 years on the date of the application." ... However, adoption of a person between the ages of 18 and 20 (inclusive) transfers both inheritance rights and filiation.

In general, a child must be between the ages of birth to 18 years and be legally free to be adopted. (A child is legally free for adoption when either birth or current legal parents have had their parental rights terminated or have consented to the child's adoption).

​Adult adoption costs $167 per adult being adopted as well as $20.75 for each decree of adoption to be certified. If the person filing the paperwork cannot afford the adult adoption costs, he or she can complete paperwork with the court to request the cost to be waived.

In addition, the federal Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 allows states to extend guardianship or adoption to individuals between 18 and 21 who've exited foster care. If you're considering the adoption of an adult, you'll want to take a closer look at the laws of your state.

In general, a child must be between the ages of birth to 18 years and be legally free to be adopted. (A child is legally free for adoption when either birth or current legal parents have had their parental rights terminated or have consented to the child's adoption).

The simple answer is 'no'. An adoption order in England & Wales cannot be made in respect of anyone aged 18 or over. The same applies in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Only minors can be adopted and must have gone through a legal process to allow this in the first place.

Such adult adoptions can assume responsibility for a mentally retarded or challenged individual or someone who is physically disabled. Through the adoption process, one adult can become the responsible party and decisionmaker for another adult's care. Guidelines and requirements for adult adoptions vary between states.

Most people are eligible to adopt, regardless of whether they are married or single, their age, income, or sexual orientation. Having a disability does not automatically disqualify a prospective adoptive parent. ... Faith-based agencies may also have specific requirements for families adopting through their agencies.

Finally, adult adoption can help ensure perpetual care for a person of diminished capacity. Formally adopting the adult with special needs may enable him or her to qualify for lifetime care under family insurance, and can help ensure assets pass to the adoptive child.