Get Complaint for Breach of Fiduciary Duty - Trust

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IN THE ___ COURT OF ___ COUNTY, ___ FOR THE ___ DISTRICT OF ___ ___ DIVISION NAME OF PLAINTIFFV.NAME OF DEFENDANT) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) )NO.COMPLAINTCOMES NOW ___, Plaintiff in the above styled cause, by
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FAQ

The federal district courts in North Carolina are: The United States District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina. The United States District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina.

District courts are divided into 41 districts across the state and sit in the county seat of each county. They may also preside in certain other cities and towns specifically authorized by the General Assembly. Unlike the superior court, the district court districts are not grouped into larger judicial divisions.

In North Carolina, there are three federal district courts, a state supreme court, a state court of appeals, and trial courts with both general and subject matter jurisdiction.

The North Carolina district courts are courts at the trial level in North Carolina. According to the court website, the court tries cases involving civil, criminal, juvenile, and magistrate matters. The district courts are split into 41 districts across the state.

There are 97 regular Superior Court judges under current state law, in addition to "special judges" who are appointed by the Governor, not elected. Judges rotate from district to district within their division every six months in order to avoid the danger of corruption or favoritism.

North Carolina is divided into three judicial districts to be known as the Eastern, Middle, and Western Districts of North Carolina.

There are 94 federal judicial districts, including at least one district in each state, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Three territories of the United States — the Virgin Islands, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands — have district courts that hear federal cases, including bankruptcy cases.

District courts hear cases involving civil, criminal, juvenile, and magistrate matters. District courts are divided into 41 districts across the state and sit in the county seat of each county.

There are currently 870 authorized Article III judgeships: nine on the Supreme Court, 179 on the courts of appeals, 673 for the district courts and nine on the Court of International Trade. The total number of active federal judges is constantly in flux, for two reasons.

The 94 U.S. judicial districts are organized into 12 regional circuits, each of which has a United States court of appeals. A court of appeals hears appeals from the district courts located within its circuit, as well as appeals from decisions of federal administrative agencies.