Get Complaint for Breach of Written Contract Seeking Damages and Attorney’s Fees

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IN THE ___COURT OF ___ (County), ___(State) ___, INC.PLAINTIFFV.CAUSE NO. 000,0000___DEFENDANT COMPLAINTCOMES NOW Plaintiff ___, Inc., (___) in the abovestyled and numbered cause, by and through its
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FAQ

The county courts are trial courts with specified limited jurisdiction. All small claims, probate, guardianship, conservatorship, adoption, and municipal ordinance violation cases are filed in the county courts.

Typically, the district court handles criminal cases and felonies, while the county court handles everything else (like misdemeanors, traffic offenses, etc.). However, the size of a county makes a difference. In small counties, both courts hear a wide variety of different matters.

State courts have general jurisdiction, and generally can hear almost all sorts of cases. All states except Alaska are divided into counties, and generally each county has a court house where the court sits. So “county court” means the state court for a particular county.

broadly speaking, the jurisdiction of "county courts" is limited to misdemeanors and civil actions involving amounts in controversy less than $15,000.00, while the "circuit courts" handle felonies and larger civil cases.

The federal court system has three main levels: district courts (the trial court), circuit courts which are the first level of appeal, and the Supreme Court of the United States, the final level of appeal in the federal system.

District courts hear cases involving civil, criminal, juvenile, and magistrate matters.

England and Wales (with the exception of the City of London, which was outside the scope of the Act) were divided into 60 circuits, with a total of 491 county courts within these circuits.

There are 13 appellate courts that sit below the U.S. Supreme Court, and they are called the U.S. Courts of Appeals. The 94 federal judicial districts are organized into 12 regional circuits, each of which has a court of appeals.

The County Court has jurisdiction to hear all indictable offences except treason, murder and certain other murder- related offences. Usually, the Director of Public Prosecutions decides whether to present a person for trial in the County or Supreme Court.

The United States has 94 judicial circuits, above which there are 12 regional Courts of Appeals: District of Columbia Circuit, for Washington, D.C.; First Circuit, for Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Puerto Rico; Second Circuit, for Vermont, Connecticut, and New York; Third Circuit, for New ...